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AIIM15 – What did it all mean? 13 Questions We Answered at #AIIM15 from AIIM President John F. Mancini @jmancini77 and Digital Landfill – http://info.aiim.org/digital-landfill

www.AIIM.org

Eria nimoditatia voluptatas aut la nimint molore velenda debissitio.

Any successful event is largely a factor of 3 factors: 1.  How well organized it is.

THANK YOU!

2.  How good the speakers are. 3.  And most importantly, what the attendees bring to the event. I wanted to thank all of the attendees for making AIIM15 SO much more than a sum of its parts. The energy and excitement and engagement you brought to the event made it special. This e-book is not intended as a comprehensive compilation of everything that occurred, but rather just a snapshot. We hope you find it helpful to explain some of the things we learned at the event to your colleagues.

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Eria nimoditatia voluptatas aut la nimint molore velenda debissitio.

What did it all

The challenge of managing the intersection of people,

mean?

the technologies and the timeframes that we use to

processes, and information is not a new one. However, manage this intersection DO change, and we are currently in the middle of a phase of high disruption and

13 Questions

uncertainty.

We Answered

Specifically, I am talking about how we manage the

at #AIIM15

1.  Improve business processes to produce optimal

intersection of people, processes, and information to:

business results; and 2.  Document or record those results and the information associated with them.

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Organizations have dealt with the challenge associated with the intersection of people, processes, and information through a series of technology waves. In each wave or era, it took some time for norms and best practices and standards to emerge. Ultimately these norms did -- generating a period of widespread adoption of that particular technology -- only to be disrupted by the next wave of technology innovation.

A couple of things are constants during periods of transition: 1.  In between eras, the technologies that ultimately become dominant in the next era struggle for an identity and a label. Ultimately an “industry” of key players emerge, and once this happens, the chaos that was characteristic of the time between eras is forgotten. 2.  In the early stages of each era, early adopters struggle with an absence of clear rules and best practices on how to best proceed. Again, these ultimately emerge, but not without a great deal of confusion during the interim. I believe there have been five main eras in managing the people, process, and information intersection. 1.  The Paper Era: For hundreds of years, the technology that fueled the intersection of people, processes and information was paper. 2.  The Micrographics Era: During the 1950s, paper began to be replaced -especially for the task of documenting and recording -- by microfilm and the Micrographics Industry was born. But, paper still remained the primary technology tied to the unstructured information in a business process. 3.  The ERP Era: In the 1960s, 1970s and into 80s, the first great wave of enterprise IT spending replaced ledgers with data, automated a significant portion of core back-end business processes, and gave birth to the ERP Industry. Amidst this automation, paper still retained its dominant role -- it remained the primary means to convey information and was the primary way that business was documented on a daily basis. AIIM15 – What did it all mean?

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4.  The Document Management and Workflow Era: In the 1980s and 1990s, we replaced some of this paper -- mostly the high-volume kind -- in selected, missioncritical processes (like new drug applications in pharmaceuticals or claims processing in insurance). We used closed local area networks to move these new electronic documents around among a limited number of specialized workers within the four walls of the enterprise. Document Management/Workflow emerged as the label we used to describe this era of people, processes and information. 5.  The ECM Era: The emergence of the internet and the maturation of core document management and imaging technologies ushered in the Enterprise Content Management Era in the early 2000s. Never a perfect industry label -- and probably more accurately a verb (something you do) than a noun (something you buy) -- “ECM” nonetheless served as a useful umbrella term for a decade. ECM described a cluster of capabilities and technologies that organizations used to capture, store, manage, deliver, and preserve the “content” (mostly images and documents) associated with processes that were 1) document intensive; and 2) mission-critical. We are now beginning the transition to a sixth era in managing people, processes, and technology.

The combined impact of consumerization, cloud and mobile, and the Internet of Things are rapidly signaling the end of the ECM Era as we know it. Organizations are struggling with best practices and norms as they make the transition to this sixth era dominated by Mobile, Analytics, Cloud, and Collaborative (MACC) technologies, and the solution providers that are part of this change are struggling with their identity as an industry. We at the cusp of a sixth era, still to be defined.

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There are several key MACC-stack driven trends on the 2020 horizon – and remember, 2020 is just 5 years away: •  New approaches to privacy and security. •  Ubiquitous broadband connectivity. •  Bottom up rather than top down innovation. •  Lots more virtual and distributed work. •  A shortage of IT “connective” and analytic skills. •  An OPEX vs. CAPEX procurement model. •  Increased regulation of the cloud by national governments.

As we prepare for these massive changes, we need to do so conscious that best practices in this emerging era do not yet exist. The community forged at AIIM15 represents the community of leaders who will help forge them. My challenge for this community is this: Between now and AIIM16, we need to break down the issues we face into very practical and direct terms that can be understood by the business. As an industry and as information professionals, we usually tend to explain the business problems we solve in “elevator pitches” that would take a 4,000-story elevator to tell and in insider terms that the business just doesn’t get. So over the next year, let’s get very practical. Let’s tell our story and build best practices in straight-forward terms focused on the twin problems confronting all knowledge workers who operate in the transforming digital workplace:

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Where do I put my “stuff” so that it is secure, shareable, and searchable so that my ORGANIZATION can accomplish its goals? and

How can I do so in a way that works the way I work and is useful to ME in getting my job done? Let’s get to work. The following “13 Questions We Answered at #AIIM15” are a start. It is not intended as a comprehensive list, just a sampling. My personal thanks go out to all of the terrific speakers at AIIM15.

John Mancini, AIIM President

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TABLE OF CONTENTS -- 13 Questions We Answered at #AIIM15 #1 -- What major information management privacy and security challenges lie ahead? #2 -- What are the “must-dos” for managing information? #3 -- How should you begin an ECM Assessment? #4 – What are the characteristics of an engaged community? #5 -- What is preventing us from creating the Digital Workplace? #6 – How is Enterprise File Sync and Share changing the market? #7 – Is records management dying? #8 – How can organizations innovate Enterprise IT? #9 – What are the 6 Challenges of the “New Normal”? #10 – What is a “Big Bucket” Governance Approach? #11 – Can You Legally Destroy Paper Records that Have Been Imaged? #12 – How Should You Deal With Change Management? #13 – What are some ways to improve content management adoption? And this was just a sample…

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1

What major information management privacy and security challenges lie ahead? (Alan Pelz-Sharpe, 451 Group, Data Privacy: The Coming Conflict)

There are two major looming privacy and security issues. The first is the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR): •  Change from Directive (Directive 95/46/EC) to Regulation (GDPR). •  The goal is to harmonize the laws of the 28 EU Member States. •  Harmonizing the laws would make international business easier, but the GDPR in its current form would create more substantial differences with the US. •  Right to be Forgotten/Right of Erasure—a major issue, but in May 2014, the EU Court of Justice held in Google Spain that the Right to be Forgotten exists under the current Directive in certain circumstances. •  International Transfer of Personal Data. •  Data Breach Notification—Change from 24 hours to “without undue delay.” •  European Council must still approve. The second major issue is the Microsoft Dublin Warrant Controversy: •  In re Warrant to Search a Certain E-Mail Account Controlled and Maintained by Microsoft Corp. (S.D.N.Y. 2014) •  US court holds a warrant for email data stored is Dublin is valid under the US Stored Communications Act of 1986 because the data are controlled by Microsoft in the US—despite being stored in Ireland. •  Microsoft—supported by tech companies—is appealing to the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, arguing that it does matter where the data are stored and that the US does not have authority to data stored in Ireland. •  If upheld, it could be a major blow to US tech companies.

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In thinking about these two looming conflicts, organizations need to think through the following: •  Take ownership of the issue. •  Know what data you are collecting and why. •  The less you collect the more secure you are – the more you collect the richer the data source – get the balance right. •  Clearly define PII and non-PII. •  Figure out a Data Loss Prevention (DLP) strategy. •  Know what laws impact your organization – does data travel overseas? •  Clean house – don’t just keep data because you can. •  Take a scenario-based approach – what are the scenarios for your organization?

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What are the “must-dos” for managing information? (Major Barry Byrne, Irish Defense Forces, Innovative Use of SharePoint 2013 for IKM in a 9000+ Person Organization)

Here are the 10 Commandments for managing information and knowledge: 1.  Secure the support of the highest level of management first. These projects need champions. 2.  Start with polices and procedures. These should be written before any solution is decided on; the technology will change over the years but the policies should remain. 3.  A clear understanding of the informational needs of end users is needed before beginning. Conduct surveys and focus groups to gather this information. 4.  When deciding on a technology strategy, first ensure the information architecture is in place, and second choose a technology that is scalable, interoperable with outside agencies and can embed rich media such as video and graphics.

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5.  Ensure technology is easy to use and has some social networking element to encourage communities of practice; this will help to win the support of end users from the first encounter. 6.  Conduct a test launch with a sample group of the organization before the full enterprise-wide launch. Valuable lessons learned will be gained before full release. 7.  A single “point of truth,” for example one portal and one search engine should be used if at all possible; multiple solutions and logins create gaps and confuse users. 8.  Train end users in the solution provided. Conduct a small amount of compulsory IKM training on all defense courses; information is the military’s most important asset, all personnel need to be familiar with how best to access it and how to keep it secure. Familiarity breeds trust. 9.  Where possible train managers/leaders separately in an informal environment, establish early buy in from leadership at each level. They will drive the change. 10. Most importantly, establish a reward system for contribution to the knowledge capital of the organization, users should be able to rate documents they have read or video clips they have viewed, and annual appraisal reports should have a section where contribution to the knowledge capital of the organization is recorded and graded.

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How should you begin an ECM Assessment? (Alix Kniefel, A. Kniefel and Associates, Before Leaping into that Technical Solution, Consider Assessing Your ECM Status)

An ECM gap assessment measures the ECM ecosystem maturity. The primary purpose is to diagnose and clarify a situation or condition. What are the major steps to consider in conducting an assessment of your ECM implementation?

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1.  Determine the Scope • 

What is the objective of the assessment?

• 

What are the parameters?

• 

When will the assessment(s) be conducted?

• 

Who are the key stakeholders?

2.  Determine assessment types • 

What assessment type(s) will achieve the objectives?

• 

What skill set is required?

3.  Form the team • 

Review Interviewing skills.

• 

Make sure team comfortable around people.

• 

Make sure team is objective (won’t bias the interpretation).

4.  Prepare the data • 

What types of techniques to use?

• 

What data should be collected? (what, where, how, and whom from)

• 

How large should the data set be (i.e., how many people)

• 

Where will the data be collected?

• 

What questions should be answered?

5.  Collect data from people • 

Create a ‘safe’ zone.

• 

Prepare participants for the session.

• 

Participants: Spend time defining needs and issues.

• 

Encourage interaction.

• 

Don’t interpret data too early! Don’t solve a problem.

• 

After the session(s): check the interpretation.

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What are the characteristics of an engaged community? (Sarah Robinson, Fierce Loyalty)

Accelerators to create more engaged employee and customer communities: 1.  Make Members Feel Valued and Important. 2.  Create Something Together. 3.  Fight a Common Enemy. 4.  Create a Culture of We. 5.  Empower Members to Make the Community Their Own. 6.  Build in Exclusivity. 7.  Establish Community Ambassadors. 8.  Stand for Something Bold. 9.  Build an Organizational Structure With an Eye Towards Pride, Trust and Passion. 10. Initiate Opportunities for Shared Experiences.

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What is preventing us from creating the Digital Workplace? (Filip Callewaert, Port of Antwerp, Belgium, How your 21st Century ECM Tools Can Act as Trojan Horses in a Stone Age Culture)

Per Peter Drucker, “The most important…contribution of management in the 20th century was the fifty-fold increase in the productivity of the manual worker in manufacturing. The most important contribution management needs to make in the 21st century is similarly to increase the productivity of knowledge work and the knowledge worker.”

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What is preventing us from creating this Digital Workplace? •  If the initiative only represents fragments in the knowledge work process (e.g., it’s only a communication channel). •  If the tools force knowledge work to happen in highly structured environments. •  If "social" is only situated in the margin of the knowledge work. •  If it is fragmented in many (partially overlapping) applications. In other words, if there is no unified knowledge work-place. •  A bad user experience.

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How is Enterprise File Sync and Share changing the market? (Alan Pelz-Sharpe, 451 Research, File Sync & Share – The future of ECM?)

How the File Sync and Share market has changed in the past 5 years: 2009

2015

Strengths

Novel, Free, Liberating, Innovative, Highly Disruptive

Enterprise grade, catalytic for delivering next gen applications

Weaknesses

Clunky and difficult to configure and manage. Insecure, consumer grade only

Seen as ‘table stakes’ a function not a product

Opportunities

Consumer file consolidation and aggregation

Healthcare, Retail, Field Services, Defense – core foundation of next gen micro apps

Threats

Hard to monetize, major players could enter market

Dropbox, Google, Amazon & Microsoft closing doors to entry

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Is records management dying? (Dan Elam, Techead, The Future of Computing: Tomorrow’s Impact on Business, Legal and Finance)

Privacy is an illusion. Google and Facebook know everything about you: •  Where you live and work. •  How much you earn. •  What you are likely to buy. •  Who your friends are. In this context, we need to rethink Records Management: •  Assume you can’t control everything. •  Decide what is important. •  Make “reasonable” attempts to manage. •  Use automated tools for disposition. •  Plan for privacy to be the big driver.

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How can organizations innovate Enterprise IT? (Atle Skjekkeland, AIIM, The Future of Enterprise IT: 6 ways information professionals can make an impact)

Many organizations are struggling with improving corporate productivity. Annual productivity gains averaged 1.6% from 1973 to 1995, but from 1996 through 2003, productivity gains more than doubled to an average annual rate of 3.3%. Enterprise IT helped to fuel this growth with new collaboration solutions and ERP, but then things stopped in 2004. We have since then seen average productivity of only 1.8% according to Labor Department data. The slowdown is according to Fed Reserve Bank of SF most noticeable in IT intensive industries.

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So how can we rethink Enterprise IT to reverse this trend? •  Create Center of Excellences with different stakeholders - identify opportunities and establish frameworks. •  Incentivize the business to identify technology that can improve or innovate business operations - let every staff become an innovator. •  Turn the IT department into technology sherpas for guiding business users – let the business innovate the business. •  Kill the traditional procurement process – focus on products, not projects. Focus on progress, not perfection. •  Replace the success metrics from from “time, cost, and features” to “value, capacity, and time-to-market” metrics. •  Plan for ongoing improvements and innovations - focus 80% on people, 15% on processes, and 5% on technology.

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What are the 6 Challenges of the “New Normal”? (Chris Surdak, Author, Forecast: Disruption)

The 6 Challenges of the New Normal: 1.  Quality: Consumers expect perfection. Deliver less and your customers will abandon you forever. 2.  Ubiquity: Globalization means anything, anywhere, anytime. Anything less is unacceptable. 3.  Immediacy: Immediate gratification. “There’s an app for that” instantly, predictively. 4.  Disengagement: Don’t build, don’t run, don’t outsource, don’t care. I only buy a result. 5.  Intimacy: Customers hunger for other forms of connectedness. Feeling like part of a community will be even more important as our needs are met more anonymously. 6.  Purpose: Support customers’ need for and sense of purpose.

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What is a “Big Bucket” Governance Approach? (Monica Crocker, Wells Fargo, The Power of Retention Schedules: I Like Big Buckets)

What is a “Big Bucket” Governance Approach? NARA Definition: •  A big bucket (large aggregation) schedule consists of items covering multiple related series of records and/or records in electronic systems. Big bucket schedule items are typically broad in regard to the number of series/systems and the scope of subject matter, function, or work process covered. Characteristics of a “Big Bucket” approach: •  Disassociated from Organization Chart. •  A small number of series or categories with a single retention applied to each. •  Retentions may be fixed, flexible or event driven. •  Does not include International. Why are organizations doing this? •  Existing systems often contain multiple record series and are too complex. •  There are too many retention schedule updates. •  It is difficult to comply with existing schedule given its complexity. •  Hard to train staff on a complex schedule.

Advantages of Big Buckets: •  Improves compliance with schedule. •  Reduces frequency of updates. •  Applies single retention to entire system. •  Easy for staff to learn and apply. AIIM15 – What did it all mean?

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Disadvantages of Big Buckets: •  Takes time and effort to develop. •  Over-retention is inevitable. •  Getting buy-in. •  Change Management needed; different than many existing approaches. •  Requires analysis and training.

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Can You Legally Destroy Paper Records that Have Been Imaged? (Robert Williams, Cohasset Associates)

Are imaged copies of paper records considered the legal equivalent of “original” records – and therefore are as admissible in evidence as the “original” paper record? The answer is: “YES!” •  Federal & State Statutes •  Uniform Photographic Copies of Business and Public Records Act •  Federal & State Case Law •  Federal rules of Evidence •  Federal & State Regulations •  Federal & State Agencies – in their own operations When are copies legally admissible? For a copy to be admissible, four conditions must be met: 1.  The record must be made in the ordinary course of business, 2.  The copy must be made in the regular course of business, 3.  The copy must be made by any process which accurately reproduces or forms a durable medium for reproducing the original, and 4.  The copy must be satisfactorily identified.

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Are the Rules of Evidence admissibility requirements for image copies of paper records a) more, b) less, or c) the same as the admissibility requirements for original paper records? The answer is: “C -The SAME!” After paper records are imaged, is the image copy admissible in a legal proceeding in lieu of the “original” paper record? The answer is: “YES!” After paper records are imaged (and those images are being retained in accordance with the organization’s retention schedule for this type of record), is it legal to destroy the “original” paper record? The answer is: “YES!”

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How Should You Deal With Change Management? (Laurie Fischer, Huron Consulting, Change Management: From Chaos to Transformation)

Critical Success Factors for any change management initiative: 1.  Active and visible executive sponsorship. 2.  Frequent and open communications. 3.  Structured change management approach. 4.  Dedicated resources for change management. 5.  Employee participation. 6.  Engagement with and support from middle management.

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What are some ways to improve content management adoption? (Bob Larrivee, AIIM, ECM Decisions: The Driving Force)

What should you do to move your ECM implementation(s) to the next step? •  Take a quick audit of where poor access to information is hurting the business – trapped on paper, spread over file shares, locked up in enterprise systems, or simply mobile-unfriendly. •  Use this to re-energise your ECM project. The more content you can converge into a single, searchable, mobile-accessible ECM system, the fewer other places you need to go to solve the problem. •  Take stock of your current ECM and DM systems and consider migrating content and consolidating. Modern auto-classification and migration products can take much of the pain out of selecting which content to recover from legacy systems, re-aligning the metadata on the way. •  If your strategy is not to consolidate, then create an enterprise search capability across the multiple repositories. Be vigilant, however, to avoid further isolated silos being created when bringing on new services. •  Evaluate how you might enhance your ECM functionality. Capture and process workflow, collaboration, digital signatures, extended search, internal social, and output management might all find a natural home within ECM. •  Look to integrate the ECM system with your other key enterprise or line-of-business systems to provide a single sign-on access point, centralized records management, and process integration. •  Consider whether any of your current ECM systems are truly fit for purpose. If they are limited in some of the core functional areas we have discussed, or are not well matched to your specific industry requirements, or need massive customization, then consider consolidating around a new, better-suited system.

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•  Moving a well-established system to the cloud merely to save on IT resource may not be a compelling proposition, but consolidating multi-site systems around a single cloud installation can solve a number of access, process and ownership issues. •  As an alternative, moving the most sharable or collaborative content to a hybrid cloud will make it much easier to connect remote, mobile and third-party users, and may head-off unofficial use of cloud file-sharing sites. Implementing selective SaaS processes linked back to the on-premise content-store may also prove to be a flexible way to move ahead. •  Bite the bullet on emails. Either use auto-classification to tag them and move them into your ECM or RM system, or implement a dedicated email archive system. Either way, they must be searchable, discoverable, and put onto a retention schedule.

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SOME ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Copies of the presentations… for Conference attendees only – we sent a direct link to the attendees – if you can’t find it, email [email protected] Twitter and social media highlights consolidated HERE https://storify.com/jmancini77/aiim15-recap Pictures from the event located HERE https://www.flickr.com/photos/aiim/sets/72157651071244339/ Melissa Breau’s graphic portrayals of some of the sessions is on this page, about halfway down the page -- HERE https://www.flickr.com/photos/aiim/sets/72157651071244339/ page8/

New AIIM white paper on Content Management 2020 located HERE http://info.AIIM.org/cm2020

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Title of the book Pictures from the event located HERE

Title of the book Pictures from the event located HERE

Thank you to our sponsor partners.

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