2016 List of all ships scrapped worldwide - Facts and Figures - NGO ...

Turkey. EU. RoW. GT. GT scrapped worldwide. 305. 222. 141. 74. 92. 22. 6. India. Bangladesh. Pakistan. China. Turkey. EU. RoW. 0. 50. 100. 150. 200. 250. 300.
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2016 List of all ships scrapped worldwide - Facts and Figures

RoW

6

EU

Ships scrapped worldwide

22

Turkey

92

China

74

Pakistan

141

Bangladesh

222

India

305 0

50

RoW

53.082

EU

38.839

100

150

200

250

300

350

GT scrapped worldwide Turkey

1.004.335

China

2.495.516

Pakistan

6.035.228

Bangladesh

9.553.930

India

8.220.191 0

2.000.000

4.000.000 GT 6.000.000

8.000.000

10.000.000

Analysis    

862 ships dismantled worldwide – 668 ended up on the beach 27,4 million GT dismantled worldwide – 23,8 million GT were beached India scrapped the most ships in numbers, but Bangladesh broke most in terms of GT, indicating that it was the preferred destination for the larger vessels EU ship recycling yards dismantled small-size vessels

320

240

160

N° scrapped ships 2014 N° scrapped ships 2015 N° scrapped ships 2016

80

0

10.000.000

8.000.000

6.000.000

GT scrapped 2014 4.000.000

GT scrapped 2015 GT scrapped 2016

2.000.000

0

Analysis   

India, Bangladesh and Pakistan had a clear increase in number of vessels and GT scrapped compared to last year China had a clear decrease in number of ships and GT recycled Turkey, EU and RoW also scrapped less vessels than last year

200

Worst global dumpers - Countries 150

9

43

Beached ships

2

100

Ships dismantled off the beach 104

50

97

4

62 32

25

4 22

0

Greece

China

India

Germany

South Korea

Japan

Analysis     

Germany is responsible for the worst shipbreaking practices amongst all shipping nations when one compares the size of its fleet to the number of ships broken irresponsibly Greece was responsible for the highest absolute number of ships sold to South Asian shipbreaking yards China sold comparatively less ships to South Asia than to recycling facilities nationally. This is mainly due to the subsidy policy adopted by the Chinese Government which supports the recycling and building of ships in China India sold all vessels to beaching facilities, 13 out of 25 were sold to Pakistan and Bangladesh. Japan sold most ships to beaching yards, including to the Bangladesh breakers

14

12

Worst global dumpers - Companies

Ships beached

10

8

6

4

2

0

Precious Shipping (Thailand)

Zodiac Group Hansa Treuhand (UK-based) (Germany)

Alpha Ship (Germany)

Peter Dohle (Germany) F. Laeisz (Germany)

Rickmers (Germany) Konig & Cie (Germany) Norddeutsche Vermog. (Germany)

Analysis  

The worst corporate dumper prize goes to the UK-based ZODIAC, which has sold 12 ships for breaking on the beaches in 2016, mostly to Bangladesh. The company has been linked to severe accidents Precious Shipping was responsible for the highest absolute number of ships sold to South Asian shipbreaking yards

120

100

European dumpers - Countries *data based on ownership 80

60

Beached ships

Ships dismantled off the beach

40

20

0

Analysis    

Greece beached 92% of its vessels Germany closely followed Greece in number of ships beached, 98% of its vessels ended up in India, Pakistan or Bangladesh Cyprus sold all vessels to the beach Norway increased the number and percentage of vessels scrapped on the beach

Ships beached

160 150 140 130 120 110 100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

Most popular end-of-life flags

Panama

St. Kitts and Nevis

Liberia

Comoros

Marshall Islands

Palau

Analysis 







According to UNCTAD, almost 73% of the world fleet is flagged in a country other than that of the vessels beneficial ownership. This means there is a huge discrepancy between the states in which the beneficial owners of a ship are based and the flag states which exercise regulatory control over the world fleet. 40% of all end-of-life ships beached in South Asia were imported under flags of convenience which are grey-or black-listed by the Paris and Tokyo Memorandum of Understanding, i.e. flags with a particularly weak record of enforcing international law. These included black-listed St Kitts and Nevis and Comoros. These “end-of-life flags” are hardly used during the operational life of a ship and offer special “discount rates” for last voyages and quick and easy short-term registration without any nationality requirements. They are particularly popular with cash-buyers that operate as middle men for sales to South Asian beaching yards. A popular new flag of convenience last year was Palau, a small island country in the Western Pacific Ocean and whose ship registry main offices are in Houston, USA and Athens, Greece. For more information on the use of FOCs at end-of-life, see our report: What a difference a flag makes. Why ship owners’ responsibility to ensure sustainable ship recycling needs to go beyond flag state jurisdiction [2015]